toy

Toy \Toy\ (toi), n. [D. tuid tools, implements, stuff, trash, speeltuig playthings, toys; akin to G. zeug stuff, materials, MNG. ziuc, Icel. tygi gear; all ultimately from the root of E. tug, v. t.; cf. G. zeugen to beget, MHG. ziugen to beget, make ready, procure. See {Tug}, v. t.] [1913 Webster] 1. A plaything for children; a bawble. --Cowper. [1913 Webster] 2. A thing for amusement, but of no real value; an article of trade of little value; a trifle. [1913 Webster] They exchange for knives, glasses, and such toys, great abundance of gold and pearl. --Abr. Abbot. [1913 Webster] 3. A wild fancy; an odd conceit; idle sport; folly; trifling opinion. [1913 Webster] To fly about playing their wanton toys. --Spenser. [1913 Webster] What if a toy take 'em in the heels now, and they all run away. --Beau. & Fl. [1913 Webster] Nor light and idle toys my lines may vainly swell. --Drayton. [1913 Webster] 4. Amorous dalliance; play; sport; pastime. --Milton. [1913 Webster] To dally thus with death is no fit toy. --Spenser. [1913 Webster] 5. An old story; a silly tale. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 6. [Probably the same word.] A headdress of linen or woolen, that hangs down over the shoulders, worn by old women of the lower classes; -- called also {toy mutch}. [Scot.] ``Having, moreover, put on her clean toy, rokelay, and scarlet plaid.'' --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster]