shame

Shame \Shame\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Shamed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Shaming}.] 1. To make ashamed; to excite in (a person) a comsciousness of guilt or impropriety, or of conduct derogatory to reputation; to put to shame. [1913 Webster] Were there but one righteous in the world, he would . . . shame the world, and not the world him. --South. [1913 Webster] 2. To cover with reproach or ignominy; to dishonor; to disgrace. [1913 Webster] And with foul cowardice his carcass shame. --Spenser. [1913 Webster] 3. To mock at; to deride. [Obs. or R.] [1913 Webster] Ye have shamed the counsel of the poor. --Ps. xiv. 6. [1913 Webster]