rave

Rave \Rave\ (r[=a]v), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Raved} (r[=a]vd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Raving}.] [F. r[^e]ver to rave, to be delirious, to dream; perhaps fr. L. rabere to rave, rage, be mad or furious. Cf. {Rage}, {Reverie}.] 1. To wander in mind or intellect; to be delirious; to talk or act irrationally; to be wild, furious, or raging, as a madman. [1913 Webster] In our madness evermore we rave. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] Have I not cause to rave and beat my breast? --Addison. [1913 Webster] The mingled torrent of redcoats and tartans went raving down the valley to the gorge of Killiecrankie. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster] 2. To rush wildly or furiously. --Spenser. [1913 Webster] 3. To talk with unreasonable enthusiasm or excessive passion or excitement; -- followed by about, of, or on; as, he raved about her beauty. [1913 Webster] The hallowed scene Which others rave of, though they know it not. --Byron. [1913 Webster]