easing

Ease \Ease\ ([=e]z), v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. {Eased} ([=e]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Easing}.] [OE. esen, eisen, OF. aisier. See {Ease}, n.] 1. To free from anything that pains, disquiets, or oppresses; to relieve from toil or care; to give rest, repose, or tranquillity to; -- often with of; as, to ease of pain; to ease the body or mind. [1913 Webster] Eased [from] the putting off These troublesome disguises which we wear. --Milton. [1913 Webster] Sing, and I 'll ease thy shoulders of thy load. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. To render less painful or oppressive; to mitigate; to alleviate. [1913 Webster] My couch shall ease my complaint. --Job vii. 13. [1913 Webster] 3. To release from pressure or restraint; to move gently; to lift slightly; to shift a little; as, to ease a bar or nut in machinery. [1913 Webster] 4. To entertain; to furnish with accommodations. [Obs.] --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] {To ease off}, {To ease away} (Naut.), to slacken a rope gradually. {To ease a ship} (Naut.), to put the helm hard, or regulate the sail, to prevent pitching when closehauled. {To ease the helm} (Naut.), to put the helm more nearly amidships, to lessen the effect on the ship, or the strain on the wheel rope. --Ham. Nav. Encyc. Syn: To relieve; disburden; quiet; calm; tranquilize; assuage; alleviate; allay; mitigate; appease; pacify. [1913 Webster]