breathe

Breathe \Breathe\, v. t. 1. To inhale and exhale in the process of respiration; to respire. [1913 Webster] To view the light of heaven, and breathe the vital air. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. To inject by breathing; to infuse; -- with into. [1913 Webster] Able to breathe life into a stone. --Shak. [1913 Webster] And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life. --Gen. ii. 7. [1913 Webster] 3. To emit or utter by the breath; to utter softly; to whisper; as, to breathe a vow. [1913 Webster] He softly breathed thy name. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] Or let the church, our mother, breathe her curse, A mother's curse, on her revolting son. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 4. To exhale; to emit, as breath; as, the flowers breathe odors or perfumes. [1913 Webster] 5. To express; to manifest; to give forth. [1913 Webster] Others articles breathe the same severe spirit. --Milner. [1913 Webster] 6. To act upon by the breath; to cause to sound by breathing. ``They breathe the flute.'' --Prior. [1913 Webster] 7. To promote free respiration in; to exercise. [1913 Webster] And every man should beat thee. I think thou wast created for men to breathe themselves upon thee. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 8. To suffer to take breath, or recover the natural breathing; to rest; as, to breathe a horse. [1913 Webster] A moment breathed his panting steed. --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster] 9. To put out of breath; to exhaust. [1913 Webster] Mr. Tulkinghorn arrives in his turret room, a little breathed by the journey up. --Dickens. [1913 Webster] 10. (Phonetics) To utter without vocality, as the nonvocal consonants. [1913 Webster] The same sound may be pronounces either breathed, voiced, or whispered. --H. Sweet. [1913 Webster] Breathed elements, being already voiceless, remain unchanged Note: [in whispering]. --H. Sweet. [1913 Webster] {To breathe again}, to take breath; to feel a sense of relief, as from danger, responsibility, or press of business. {To breathe one's last}, to die; to expire. {To breathe a vein}, to open a vein; to let blood. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]