beat

Scoop \Scoop\, n. [OE. scope, of Scand. origin; cf. Sw. skopa, akin to D. schop a shovel, G. sch["u]ppe, and also to E. shove. See {Shovel}.] 1. A large ladle; a vessel with a long handle, used for dipping liquids; a utensil for bailing boats. [1913 Webster] 2. A deep shovel, or any similar implement for digging out and dipping or shoveling up anything; as, a flour scoop; the scoop of a dredging machine. [1913 Webster] 3. (Surg.) A spoon-shaped instrument, used in extracting certain substances or foreign bodies. [1913 Webster] 4. A place hollowed out; a basinlike cavity; a hollow. [1913 Webster] Some had lain in the scoop of the rock. --J. R. Drake. [1913 Webster] 5. A sweep; a stroke; a swoop. [1913 Webster] 6. The act of scooping, or taking with a scoop or ladle; a motion with a scoop, as in dipping or shoveling. [1913 Webster] 7. a quantity sufficient to fill a scoop; -- used especially for ice cream, dispensed with an ice cream scoop; as, an ice cream cone with two scoops. [PJC] 8. an act of reporting (news, research results) before a rival; also called a {beat}. [Newspaper or laboratory cant] [Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC] 9. news or information; as, what's the scoop on John's divorce?. [informal] [PJC] {Scoop net}, a kind of hand net, used in fishing; also, a net for sweeping the bottom of a river. {Scoop wheel}, a wheel for raising water, having scoops or buckets attached to its circumference; a tympanum. [1913 Webster]